Workshop Themes and Topics 2


1. The National Security Enterprise
2. National Security Authorities
3. NSC and Interagency Policy Formulation
4. Strategy Development: NSS, NDS, and NMS
5. Civil-Military Relations


6. Force Planning and Employment
7. Linking Resources to Strategy


8. DoD Relations with Congress
9. DoD Relations with the Public and Media
10. OSD Interactions with Joint Staff1

1In the first iteration of this workshop, Topic 10 will be offered to DOD attendees and focus on OSD-JS interacion. In subsequent iterations, this topic will focus on DoD interactions with the National Security Council.

Policy and Strategy Development


Description

Topic 1 provides an executive overview of the U.S. national security enterprise from the Secretary or Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff perspective.2 During this session the Secretary or Chairman identifies his principle challenges, provides his priority and discusses current decision-making environments. Ideally, the Secretary or Chairman would reference the primary offices, departments, and agencies involved in developing national security policy and describes how they interact. This topic should highlight executive and legislative branch responsibilities, as well as the White House offices and Congressional committees involved in national security affairs. This session demonstrates the importance of the workshop and provides the context for the subsequent sessions.

Topic Objectives

1. Identify Senior Leader U.S. national security enterprise challenges.
2. Describe constitutional and legislative authorities, traditional roles, and assigned missions.
3. Comprehend the dynamics in developing and implementing national security strategy.
4. Apply the fundamentals of national security decision-making to a contemporary topic.

Key Questions

1. Who are the key players (people and institutions) in the national security enterprise?
2. How are these roles and structures different from our key allies and partners?
3. Will you have a counterpart in another country’s Ministry of Defense and how will you work with them?
4. Will you have a counterpart in another U.S. government department or agency and how will you work with them?

References

1. U.S. Constitution (via National Archives)
2. U.S. Code (via U.S. House of Representatives Office of the Law Revision Counsel)
3. National Security Act of 1947 *PDF (via the CIA Reading Room)
4. Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 *PDF (via the OSD Historical Office)

Notes and Special Requirements

Pocket copy of the U.S. Constitution *For purchase from GPO at $1.50 each



Description

Topic 2 describes who in the contemporary national security enterprise is empowered to do what, according to established U.S. federal law. This session will describe how the legal framework intends for the National Security Council and entities within the national security enterprise to operate. This topic addresses some functions of the Congress, including authorizing expenditures and appropriating funds in support of defense and national security policy but a later topic will more fully address the day-to-day relationships between DOD and Congress.

Topic Objectives

1. Identify the laws, statutes, and policy from which organizations derive their authority.
2. Analyze shared, overlapping, or complementary areas of responsibility and authority.
3. Describe how tensions between organizations can be alleviated.

Key Questions 

1. What are some recent and relevant, legal or statutory changes and how have they affected U.S. national security?
2. What is a likely area of tension for your office with respect to shared authorities?
3. What do we need to know about how our allies and partners view our national security enterprise?

References

The U.S. Code, specifically Title 10, Title 22, Title 32, and Title 50.

Notes and Special Requirements

Knowing the contents of the U.S. Code is important but most likely case studies will bring this topic to life. The Iran-Contra controversy, Operation Noble Eagle, Libya’s abandonment of its WMD program, and the Osama bin Laden raid are a few examples where complementary and overlapping authorities could be used to emphasize the topic objectives.